TEDxAt Martello, we never questioned why Kanata North was chosen three years ago to be the host location for a TEDx conference. We have already written  about how we are proud to be among the great minds and big picture thinkers that are excited to set down roots in Kanata North.  TED’s mission is to spread ideas and to create an environment that helps to spark conversation – that is very much what happens on a daily basis here in Kanata North and at Martello.

Did you know that TED event attendees are carefully curated and include a delicate mix of not only CEO’s but also scholars, artists and scientists? This eclectic mix of attendees is handpicked by the organizers because every attendee is meant to contribute to the dynamic environment where innovative ideas are presented. At Martello, we believe in cultivating a similar ‘winning formula’ of employees in our office and create a workplace that nurtures curious minds and the type of forward thinking that comes up with big ideas that have a lasting impact on our business.

Last year’s TEDxKanata was a resounding success and our CEO, Bruce Linton being a speaker was a highlight for us at Martello.  Fast-forward to this year’s TEDxKanata and we are excited to be a sponsor at this great event that sees visionaries and artist coming together to support a single theme: ‘The Next 150: Driving Change’ celebrating Canada’s 150 years as a nation. We are excited by this year’s lineup which includes speakers like Mark Dabrowski, co-founder of Teldio and Allan Lee Brown the director and founder of Compasio Relief & Development.

Be a Part of It – Win a Ticket

Attending a TED conference is said to be ‘a journey into the future in the company of those creating it’ and at Martello we want to talk you along! How can you enter? Be sure to fill out our online form by March 1st for your chance to win a ticket. The winner will be announced on Thursday, March 2nd @12:00 PM. 

A Few of Martello’s Favourite TED Talks

With the excitement building for this year’s conference, we started talking in the office about some of our favourite TED Talks – it seems like everyone has one that stands out. Take a look below for a few of our favourites and the reasons why they had such an impact on us.

How great leaders inspire action by Simon Sinek : EUGENE LEE, Software DeveloperTEDx
Why it’s great: Simon was the speaker that inspired me to start using the phrase, “I believe…”
He is the reason why I changed using “I think…” at the beginning of sentence to ”I  believe…”.

Why is ‘x’ the unknown? by Terry Moore : ANTOINE ROUX, Software Designer:
Why it’s great: You really learn something in this TED talk.

My escape from North Korea by Hyeonseo LeeHARRY ANDREWS, Software Designer
Why it’s great: The speaker’s whole story was very inspiring – Hyeonseo was almost caught many times. At one point in her story she said that a complete stranger from Australia, who had no idea of her heritage, helped her by paying bail to get her out of jail – that act of a total stranger seeing what was happening and assisting her was very inspirational.

A love poem for lonely prime numbers by Harry Baker : CHRIS WILSON, Software TEDxArchitect
Why it’s great: I love language and it’s an exemplary display of how clever one can be with it. 

Do schools kill creativity? By Ken Robinson : SARA PURDON, Marketing Specialist
Why it’s great: This presenter discusses how we can be nurturing creative spirit in students and how our current school system is not currently set up to do this effectively. He actually goes on to say that most schools are currently doing the exact opposite from nurturing a love of learning in students. 

Overcoming Dyslexia, Finding Passion by Piper Ottbein : SALINA TRAN, Marketing Specialist:TEDx
Why it’s great: I like this TED Talk because learning disabilities are very common, and it’s inspiring to see someone as young as Piper had the strength to share her struggles and how she overcame dyslexia. 

Your body language shapes who you are by Amy Cuddy : TRACY KING, Director of Marketing
Why it’s great: In this talk, Amy tells a great personal story to underpin the message that something as small as body language can have a big impact on the way you think of and project yourself.